Proposition 57 Parole For Nonviolent Inmates

Proposition 57

Proposition 57, “The Public Safety and Rehabilitation Act of 2016,” allows parole consideration for people convicted of nonviolent felonies after they have completed the full term for their primary offense.

The goal of the law is to stop the revolving door of crime by better preparing inmates to succeed when they re-enter our communities.
proposition 57

Parole Process

All inmates currently serving a conviction for a non-violent offense as defined by the California Penal Code will be able to participate in the parole process. The new parole consideration process began on July 1, 2017.

However, inmates are not automatically granted parole. Parole MAY be granted to inmates who have completed the full term for their primary offense and demonstrated that they should no longer be considered a current threat to public safety.
proposition 57

Additional Credits

“Credits” are how the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation tracks the number of days remaining on inmate sentences. Proposition 57 allows inmates to earn additional credits for good behavior and participation in rehabilitative, educational and career training programs.

The previous credit system is based on the crime committed. Under proposition 57, credits will be based on conduct and participation in programs. The CDCR will now award increased credits for Good Conduct and Milestone Completion Programs. CDCR will also begin awarding credits for Rehabilitative Achievement and Educational Merit.

Who Can Receive Credits?

Inmates sentenced to death or life without parole are not eligible to receive credits. All other inmates are eligible.
proposition 57

When Did Credits Start?

  • Good Conduct Credits began on May 1, 2017.
  • Milestone Completion, Rehabilitative Achievement, and Educational Merit Credits began on August 1, 2017.

All credits except can be revoked for disciplinary infractions except Educational Merit Credits.

Changes To Juvenile Justice System

Proposition 57 removed the prosecutor’s authority to decide whether juveniles charged with certain crimes should be tried in juvenile or adult court. That decision will now be made by judges.

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